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Celebrating 24 Years of the ADA – Gateway to the Community
July 23, 2014 Posted by

This post appears courtesy of Eve Hill, Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights

TUESDAY:  Gateway to the Community

This week, in honor of the 24th anniversary of the ADA, we recognize and celebrate the different doorways that the ADA is opening up to people with disabilities.  Today, we highlight the ADA as a doorway to the community.

With the enactment of the ADA, Congress provided a clear and comprehensive national mandate to eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities.  Consistent with this, the Civil Rights Division works to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for people with all types of disabilities.  In short, we work to provide people with disabilities with meaningful opportunities to live life to their fullest potential.

Over the past year, we have continued our aggressive efforts to enforce the Supreme Court’s decision in Olmstead v. L.C., which recognized that the civil rights of people with disabilities are violated under the ADA when they are unnecessarily segregated from the rest of society.  Under the ADA, states are required to avoid unnecessarily placing persons with disabilities in institutions and to ensure that they receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs.  In this administration, the division has engaged in Olmstead enforcement activities in approximately 45 matters in 24 states on behalf of children and adults with physical, mental, and developmental disabilities who are in or at risk of entering segregated settings, including state-run and private institutions, nursing homes, board and care homes, and sheltered workshops.  Just last year, we participated in 18 Olmstead matters across the country.  Under statewide settlement agreements we have reached in eight states, over 46,000 people with disabilities across the country will have the opportunity to live and participate in their communities.

One of the most recent examples of our work ensuring community integration of adults with serious mental illness was in New Hampshire where the department finalized an agreement with the state to significantly expand and enhance its capacity to address the needs of over three thousand adults with serious mental illness in integrated community settings.  The agreement requires New Hampshire to create mobile crisis teams and community crisis apartments throughout the state as an alternative to more restrictive settings; to increase Assertive Community Treatment teams; to provide much more supported housing that is scattered throughout the community; and to significantly increase the number of people receiving integrated supported employment services in New Hampshire.

All of the decree requirements will foster the independence of people with serious mental illness and enable them to participate more fully in community life.  The expanded community services will significantly reduce visits to hospital emergency rooms and will avoid unnecessary institutionalization at state mental health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital (the state’s psychiatric hospital) and the Glencliff Home (the state nursing home for people with mental illness).  Recently, the governor of New Hampshire signed into law a funding bill that will enable the state to implement the terms of the decree.  The new law authorizes approximately $9 million in additional mental health funding through next summer and commits the state to over $64 million in additional mental health funding through state fiscal year 2018.  Click here for more information.

To find out more about DOJ Olmstead enforcement work, visit the Olmstead: Community Integration for Everyone website, and visit our Faces of Olmstead website to read about some of the individuals whose lives have been improved by the Olmstead decision and the department’s Olmstead enforcement efforts.  For more general information on the Americans with Disabilities Act, visit ADA.gov, or call the toll-free ADA Information Line at (800) 514-0301 (voice) or (800) 514-0383 (TTY).

Bureau of Justice Statistics Recognized for Studies on Prison Rape
June 5, 2014 Posted by

Courtesy of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs

The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and its data collection agents received the 2014 Policy Impact Award from the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) for their innovative and salient efforts to measure sexual victimization in correctional facilities under the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA).

AAPOR, a leading association of survey research professionals, stated in the award citation, “the findings, and their extensive publicity, have triggered special investigations by governors and state legislatures and immediate changes in policies and plans of action. Findings from the project are now cited extensively in training for correctional administrators on how to prevent and respond to prison rape. Without these data, national standards for best practices to eliminate rape and other related violence among prisoners could not have been promulgated.”

BJS has released 14 separate reports on prison rape since 2004. Television, print media, researchers and public interest groups extensively covered the findings at local, state and national levels. Coverage included 32 articles in newspapers and magazines and a series of four articles in The New York Review of Books.

AAPOR selected the PREA team for its outstanding work developing a state-of-the art, multi-measure, multi-mode approach that relied on both victim self-report surveys and administrative records. When Congress passed the PREA bill in 2003 it required BJS to measure sexual victimization in correctional facilities and publish rankings of facilities with the highest and lowest rates of sexual victimization. At that time there was no infrastructure for such a data collection and there was little agreement on a methodology that would generate accurate estimates. Both inmate self‐reports of sexual victimization and reports from facility administrators were considered high risk for both over-reporting and underreporting of incidents.

“We had to develop a complex statistical infrastructure that would enable us to measure a very sensitive issue that was far more nuanced than we knew,” said Allen J. Beck, BJS Senior Statistical Advisor and program lead. “The prison rape data collection represents a 10-year effort to build a program for accurately measuring the prevalence of sexual victimization in the nation’s more than 7,600 correctional facilities covered under PREA,” he added.

The BJS-led team actively reached out to all stakeholders as it developed survey protocols, measurement strategies and reporting criteria. The team established definitions of sexual victimization that would hold true for each survey and facility, addressed complex human subject concerns such as protecting respondents from retaliation by other inmates or facility staff, set statistical standards for defining high-rate facilities and developed a plan for disseminating the findings. Almost immediately upon release, the BJS data led to several direct policy or program actions at local, state, and federal levels.

The PREA statistics program includes four separate collections: the Survey on Sexual Violence, the National Inmate Survey, the National Survey of Youth in Custody, and the National Former Prisoner Survey. These combined surveys reach a level of data collection not seen previously. They assess the incidence of sexual victimization in correctional facilities through victim self-reporting, survey facilities’ administrative records, reach out to ex-offenders now living in the community, and survey youth held in juvenile and adult facilities.

The PREA effort shows the effectiveness of combining the talents of BJS and four major data collection agencies―RTI International, Westat, NORC at the University of Chicago, and the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition to Allen J. Beck, BJS principal staff involved in the PREA research were former BJS statisticians Paige M. Harrison, Paul Guerino and Christopher J. Mumola. Among the data collection agencies, the principal staff included David Cantor, John Hartge and Tim Smith at Westat; Marcus Berzofsky, Rachel Caspar and Christopher Krebs at RTI International; Candace Johnson at NORC; and Greta Clark at the U.S. Census Bureau.

Allen J. Beck accepted the 2014 Policy Impact Award from AAPOR on behalf of the PREA team at the annual AAPOR conference in Anaheim, Calif. on May 17.

Dr. Beck is also a former recipient of the Attorney General’s Award for his work on PREA.

Visit www.bjs.gov for all BJS PREA-related reports and documents and additional information about BJS’s statistical publications and programs.

AAPOR_Group

Commemorating the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education and Continuing the March toward Justice
May 16, 2014 Posted by

Editor’s Note: On Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. ET, Attorney General Eric Holder will deliver remarks of reflection at the Morgan State University commencement ceremony where he will commemorate the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. The address will be live streamed at www.morgan.edu/live.

By U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and Senior Advisor to the President Valerie Jarrett

Decades ago, nearly 200 plaintiffs from across the country joined together in a class-action lawsuit to challenge the doctrine of “separate but equal,” striving to bring the issue of racial segregation before the highest court in the land.  Their dangerous, long, and grueling march culminated exactly 60 years ago tomorrow – on May 17, 1954 – at the United States Supreme Court.

On that extraordinary day, a unanimous Court, led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, declared that separate was inherently unequal, effectively outlawing racial segregation in schools and other public accommodations throughout America.  This marked a major victory for the cause of equal justice under law, an inflection point in American history, and a spark that in many ways ignited the modern Civil Rights Movement.

Yet our nation did not automatically translate the words of Brown into substantive change.  The integration of our schools was a process that was halting, confrontational, and at times even bloody.  And, for all the progress our nation has seen over the last six decades, this is a process that continues, and a promise that has yet to be fully realized, even today.

While the number of school districts that remain under desegregation court orders has decreased significantly in just the past decade, the Department of Justice continues to actively enforce and monitor nearly 200 desegregation cases where school districts have not yet fulfilled their legal obligation to eliminate segregation “root and branch.”  In those cases, the department works to ensure that all students have the building blocks of educational success – from access to advanced placement classes, to facilities without crumbling walls and old technology, to safe and positive learning environments.  The Departments of Justice and Education are also working together to reform misguided school discipline policies that fuel the “school-to-prison pipeline.”  Some of these policies, while well-intentioned, have resulted in students of color facing suspensions and expulsions at a rate three times higher than that of their white peers.  And the Administration is moving in a variety of ways to dismantle racial barriers and promote inclusion, from America’s classrooms, to our courtrooms, to our voting booths – and far beyond.

As we continue these efforts, reflect on this milestone anniversary, and recommit ourselves to the critical work that remains before us, it’s worth remembering that the outcome in Brown v. Board was never inevitable.  It was brought about by citizens from all walks of life across the country.  For six decades, it has provided resounding proof that – within the framework of our judicial system, and through the power of collective action – progress is possible.  And today, it continues to show us that those who are willing to struggle, to march toward justice, to stand up for a principle, or simply to take a seat – in a courthouse or a classroom, at a lunch counter or the front of a bus – can, and do, change the world for the better.

Learn more: Read the Presidential proclamation marking the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

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Fighting for Justice and Survival : Africa’s Wildlife
May 9, 2014 Posted by

Courtesy of the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division

A delegation of wildlife conservation and environmental officials, as well as nongovernmental leaders, from 13 African nations met today with Acting Assistant Attorney General Robert G. Dreher, trial attorneys and environmental crimes prosecutors from the Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD). The visitors are participating in the State Department’s International Visitor Leadership Program “Wildlife Conservation: Anti-poaching and anti-trafficking”. Participants learned about U.S. efforts to combat illegal wildlife trafficking and discussed ways to enhance international collaboration to fight the trade. In many parts of Africa, species like the African elephant and the black rhino are threatened with extinction by poachers, often organized and well-armed groups that feed a lucrative international trade in wildlife and wildlife parts.

The Justice Department co-chairs a national task force on wildlife trafficking with the Department of State and Department of the Interior, and with other federal agency partners, all working to carry out the President’s National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking

Photo of Acting Assistant Attorney General Robert G. Dreher and ENRD staff with the African delegation at the Justice Department

Acting Assistant Attorney General Robert G. Dreher and ENRD staff with the African delegation at the Justice Department 

Read more on the Justice Department’s efforts to fight and end the illegal trade in wildlife and the national strategy to combat wildlife trafficking.

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Staying Involved During National Child Abuse Prevention Month, April 2014
April 23, 2014 Posted by

Courtesy of Karol V. Mason, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs

When he proclaimed April as National Child Abuse Prevention Month, President Obama said, “Every child should have every chance in life, every chance at happiness, and every chance at success. Yet tragically, hundreds of thousands of young Americans shoulder the burden of abuse or neglect.” The President urged Americans to remember that we all have a role to play in preventing child abuse and neglect and in helping young victims recover.

Protecting children is a top priority of Attorney General Eric Holder. Since his days as a prosecutor he has recognized the terrible impact of violence, trauma and abuse on children and the importance of coordinating our response. As Deputy Attorney General under Janet Reno, he established “Safe Start,” a program designed to reduce the impact of children’s exposure to violence. When he took office as Attorney General in 2009, he picked up where he left off and launched “Defending Childhood,” an ongoing initiative to improve our understanding of the impact of children’s exposure to violence, turning that knowledge into workable strategies and effective programs.

This work comes at a critical time. A study released in 2009 by our Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention showed that an astonishing 60 percent of children in the United States are exposed to some form of violence, crime, or abuse, ranging from brief encounters as witnesses to violent episodes as victims. The consequences of exposure to violence and abuse can lead in the short term to poor performance in school and to drug and alcohol abuse, but far more devastating is the long-term physical and psychological harm to the affected child. Kids who are exposed to violence have higher rates of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and other physical issues. They are at greater risk of future victimization and suicide.

This damage extends beyond the individual children who are affected. We all feel the effects in rising healthcare, criminal justice, and other public costs. This significant public safety problem is fast becoming a serious public health problem – and it requires a wide-ranging response.

The good news is that because children are resilient, intervention and prevention work. OJP’s bureaus are engaged in supporting research that translates into programs and resources for those working with children.

For example, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention helps victims of child abduction and commercial sexual exploitation, and supports mentoring programs for tribal youth and faith-based and community initiatives.
The National Institute of Justice’s Violence Against Women and Family Violence Research and Evaluation program promotes the safety of women and family members and aims to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes.

The Office for Victims of Crime has highlighted the issue with its remarkable series of videos, “Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence and Trauma” and this year will fund demonstration sites to establish a consistent, coordinated response to child and youth victims and their families and caregivers.

We are also collecting information on the needs of underserved populations. Because relatively little is known about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native children, and because what we do know is of great concern, the Attorney General appointed a new task force specifically to study this issue. That task force is now holding hearings throughout the country, addressing the impact of child sexual abuse, the intersection between child maltreatment and domestic violence, and the impact of the juvenile justice system.

This month also gives us a chance to thank those already committed to helping children in need. Recently I was privileged to speak to over 1,000 people at the National Symposium on Child Abuse about their work at child advocacy centers, where children who are brought into contact with our child protective and justice systems are getting the services they need to deal with the trauma they have experienced, such as critical medical care and coordinated and efficient case management.

Eliminating child abuse is a huge challenge. Thousands of children in communities across America need us – all of us – to advocate for their future, to determine whether it will be one darkened by the violence and abuse they have experienced or one lit by care and hope. As the President said in his proclamation, “Our nation thrives when we recognize that we all have a stake in each other. This month and throughout the year, let us come together — as families, communities, and Americans — to ensure every child can pursue their dreams in a safe and loving home.”

I encourage everyone to join in dialogues and community events that put our children front and center in our lives. For Office of Justice Programs resources on this topic please visit http://ojp.gov/, and for direct help addressing child abuse contact the National Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-422-4453.

Naturalization Ceremony Blog Post – “Welcoming New Partners to our Bold Experiment”
April 16, 2014 Posted by

 

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This post is courtesy of Associate Attorney General Tony West.

On Tuesday, I had the privilege of speaking to hundreds of new citizens at a naturalization ceremony held at Hayfield Secondary School in Alexandria, Va.  It was an incredible experience — one that made me proud of our country’s well-earned reputation as a beacon of hope to the rest of the world.  Gathered in one place were 700 individuals from over 100 different countries, represented by different flags, different cultures and different systems of government.  These 700 took an oath in unison and in one single moment they all became Americans. 

Of course, their individual journeys to this day were much more unique, complicated and hard fought than could ever be captured in a moment.  Some came from across the globe — from nations like Brazil, Russia, India, China, Ireland, Ghana and Afghanistan.  Others came from our neighbors – Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.  Some of them are business owners, doctors, teachers, artists and engineers.  And some are parents caring for America’s next generation.  

Some are new citizens like Corporal Jorge Luis Cuji Villacis, who came here from Ecuador when he was 11 years old, went to school and then joined the U.S. Marine Corps because he wanted to make his family proud, serve this country and become a better person. 

And what I found so inspiring about this ceremony is what it reaffirmed about this country.  We are a nation bound together not by a shared race, a single ethnicity or a state-sanctioned religious faith.  We ask neither that such traits be inherited nor left behind.  Instead, our country is defined by our founding principles: freedom, equality and democracy.  The idea that you are free to control your destiny and help shape the future of this nation, no matter where you came from, no matter who your ancestors are and no matter what you look like.  More than a place on the map, that spirit is what the United States of America represents and it’s what these new citizens embody. 

Becoming an American citizen and taking part in our shared story is a precious privilege that no one in that auditorium took for granted.  So as we welcome these new partners to our bold experiment in self-government, we must work to improve the inefficient immigration system that hampered them, and so many other talented immigrants, from starting their lives here.

We know that we can improve that system by strengthening our borders, streamlining legal immigration, holding employers accountable and creating a firm but fair path to earned citizenship for those immigrants who are already contributing to our economy and society in so many ways.  

That’s why we remain committed to working with Congress to enact comprehensive immigration reforms that will do justice to our immigration system and the hard working, talented individuals who come through that system seeking the privilege of becoming an American.

 
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